Posts

 

Sheri Weinhold is an entrepreneur and has designed metal garden art for the past 10 years. The creativity and zeal she nurtured over the years have led her to the creation of Crazy Loops. The Crazy Loops product is her passion because they allow students, adults, athletes, musicians, everyone to show off their interests and hobbies – a vital part of self-expression. She currently resides in Pennsylvania.

We talked to Sheri Weinhold about the invention of Crazy Loops and her hopes for the future, check out the interview below: 

Sheri Weinhold inventor of Crazy Loops for Flying Cork

Sheri Weinhold

Q: Is this your first invention?

A: It is, actually.

Q: Did you ever imagine being the creator of a product like this?

A: Oh yeah. It’s always been a passion of mine. It’s definitely because of the creativity and entrepreneurship that I have sort of been involved in my whole life. I was heavily into flipping houses and then for the last 10 years, it’s been design work and creating hand-made garden art.

Q: Are Crazy Loops related, do you think, to making the garden art?

A: No, actually, they sort of came to be as a product of their own.

Q: So, how did you come up with the idea for Crazy Loops?

A: I was planning to attend a cancer walk in my area in support of a friend’s child and thought it would be fun to dress up. I wanted to decorate my sneakers, but I couldn’t find anything that wasn’t simply me tying a ribbon somewhere on me, so I cut one of those thick silicone bracelets into the shape of the cancer ribbon and then attached it to my sneakers with a safety pin. After the walk was over, I got so many compliments, and I thought about how neat and fun the rough version of this product was and decided to create Crazy Loops. They’re not just cancer ribbons, they’re sports, emojis, music notes, anything people find interesting. We have over 20 different designs, now.

Q: Did they turn out how you pictured them?

A: They still had the same basic idea that I had originally come up with, but I knew some aspects of my prototype would need to be changed. The safety pin has been replaced, and the attaching mechanism we use now has also changed over time. But Crazy Loops generally have the same type of look as they did when we first started development.

Q: What do Crazy Loops mean to you?

A: I have a lot of passion for Crazy Loops because I feel like they’re such a great way to showcase your interests to others. I feel like if you’re wearing something like one of our colored ribbons, people will see it and ask about it. So they will both raise awareness and express interests and causes that you care about. I love them, and I think they’re a really fun product that everyone can enjoy – not just kids, but adults, too.

Q: Who do you think could benefit from Crazy Loops?

A: I think that people of all ages could really benefit from Crazy Loops for a few reasons. Kids ages 5 to 12 can use them to express themselves and show off their interests that are just beginning to develop, teachers can use them for incentives to read more or as a prize for doing well, parents can use them to support their kids or maybe even their own interests, there’s something for everyone. They’re versatile and just a lot of fun.

Q: How do you think Crazy Loops, and their bookmarks, will encourage readers?

A: So, I absolutely love how combining the bookmarks and the Crazy Loops came together as a product. I actually presented one of the bookmarks to two different teachers and, while talking, one little boy in the class said he would love to start reading so that he could use that bookmark. He even asked the teacher if she had any, to which she had to tell him “not yet.” I think having something to express themselves with can really create more excitement around reading for young students. Everyone likes to express themselves, and kids I think will really take to the idea of having a Crazy Loop with a basketball or music note or emoji hanging out of whatever book they’re reading that day.

Q: How do Crazy Loops improve education through expression?

A: I think they can be encouraging, and it’s a great item for the teachers to have as incentives. Almost like a prize. They could say, “If you do your reading on time, you could choose a Crazy Loop to attach to your bookmark.” The fun thing about Crazy Loops is that a child could even take it off the bookmark and put in on the ring of their binder, or backpack, or shoes, wherever there is a loop to attach it to.

Q: What do you hope to see Crazy Loops achieve in the future?

A: I think we could do a lot with them in the future. I was thinking of possibly tying them into an anti-bullying campaign. The main goal is I really want to encourage kids to want to read, not just to read.

 

For more about Crazy Loops and Sheri Weinhold, click here.